The Greater Fugamus

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Female Greater Fugamus

The Greater Fugamus is a large bipedal rodent that populates a vast majority of Yabun Forest. Females live in small herds of about eight while males are solitary. Both sexes posses a pair of enlarged top canine teeth, although the males have the larger. Males will compare tusks and lift their upper lip as they spit, kick, and grunt at each other during mating season as they compete for territories. Male Greater Fugamus fight to hold onto these territories in hopes that a herd of females will settle in and mate. They can be very aggressive toward each other and have been known to severely wound one another in battles for mates.

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Male Greater Fugamus

Greater Fugamus eat a variety of plant matter including berries, fruits, tree bark, grasses, seeds, and leaves. They use their four fingered paws to carefully select the food they want to consume and spend most of the day grazing around the forest. It is estimated that a population of about 200,000 Greater Fugamus inhabit this forestbut the exact numbers are unknown. They have poor eyesight but an incredible sense of hearing and smell. Theyare swift and can run at about 30 miles an hour, even through the dense undergrowth. Their long whiskers aid in navigating through the brush as they bound and charge through Yabun Forest.

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Male Greater Fugamus

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3 Responses to The Greater Fugamus

  1. Mexanik says:

    If there lives Greater fugamus, there also must be at least two species- baseline rodent creature (Fugamus fugamus) that lives all over Solturna, and “lesser fugamus” from plains or the same area (bipedal animals prefer to live in “open” areas without lots of obstacles like trees or rocks). Fugamus looks like kangaroo so I think it must be its evolution twin ^)

  2. Mexanik says:

    Bipedal one is a good idea too =) It can live outside of the forest just as creature from the Earth like kangarooo… or ostrich %)

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